Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content
Skip Navigation LinksHome>Services>New build>Medupi>Media centre>* Good News Stories
* Good News Stories

 Skills development at the heart of Medupi                                                             .

Lephalale Site Services takes pride in feeding Medupi's small army

The Medupi Legacy Programme - doing things with people and not for them

Being a jack of all trades made her a business magnate

A school born out of love is a beacon of progress for Lephalale

Wellness centre a huge relief for Seleka village

Meet the rough diamond turned foreman at Medupi Power Station

Business of Eskom Contractor Academy graduate thriving

 


 

 

 Skills development at the heart of Medupi                        Back to Top

When Eskom began the construction of the Medupi Power Station, the world 's fourth largest coal-powered station, it realised there were a limited number of people in Lephalale who possess the required skills, academic qualifications and experience to work on the site.

However this has changed drastically as the new build project has been unfolding and the number of on-the-job trainees has been increasing, largely thanks to the Medupi Legacy Programme - which has been designed to change people's lives in very practical terms.

Each contract within the Medupi Power Station project has Accelerated and Shared Growth Initiative for South Africa (Asgisa) targets and as such, Eskom has placed contractual requirements on its contractors, such as Aveng Grinaker-LTA, a multi-disciplinary construction and engineering group, to contribute to skills development, job creation, enterprise development, education and human resource development.

There are currently 17 086 people working on site at Medupi, 7 679 of which are from the Lephalale municipality many of which have undergone training and skill development through the Legacy Programmes.

One of these skills development initiatives is the Medupi Power Station Joint Venture (MPS JV) Onverwacht Training Centre which was built in April 2008 with the main focus of empowering the local people by training selected individuals in selected civil trades dictated by the construction of Medupi. The training provided is accredited by the Construction Education and Training Authority (CETA) and so far, has put 45 people through their learnership programme and 205 through their skills development programme.

Recruitment for these learnership and skills programmes are done via the local Department of Labour with a grade 12 pass as an entry requirement. Candidates are identified, interviewed, assessed and checked for medical fitness and selected according to the needs dictated by the construction of the Medupi Power Station.

Upon completion of the learnership programme and depending on what they have been trained in, candidates receive a Certificate in Construction Masonry, Certificate in Construction Carpentry or a Certificate in Concrete Reinforcing. Skills programmes include steel fixing, shutter hands, concrete hands, bricklayers and scaffold erectors. All candidates receive on-the-job training for a period of time at the construction site.

Junior Supervisor Training with a NQF4 National Certificate qualification and Professional Mentorship Training in Civil Engineering, Construction Management, Quantity Surveying and Land/Engineering Surveyors are also provided.

Says Medupi General Manager Roman Crookes: "At the end of the day, the reward for us is really going to bed at night knowing that we have made a difference and maybe even have changed the lives of talented and hardworking people. We want to ensure that while Medupi addresses the immediate concerns of the local community, such as employment and procurement opportunities, it also lays a solid foundation for sustainable growth and development through skills development."

Margaret Makakaba (39) from Abbotspoort who has a N4 certificate in Business Management started her training with Aveng Grinaker-LTA's training centre in 2011. She worked for several years as a security guard at a Lephalale clinic but after hearing about the skills training opportunity, decided to apply. She is now a trained steel fixer and reinforcer and is currently working on site.

Says Makakaba: "I am looking forward to the opportunities and the work that the training I have received will open up for me. It has been very helpful and I am enjoying working here." 


Lephalale Site Services takes pride in feeding Medupi 's small army       Back to Top

With a head count of over 17 000 at the Medupi Power Station, making sure workers are fed is no easy feat but Lephalale Site Services (LSS) does it efficiently and with pride.

LSS is a joint venture involving Fedics Site Services and Moon Cloud, a local community partner - together they are responsible for serving 20 000 meals per day at Medupi. The business is situated at the Marapong Village in Lephalale and the facility has a capacity for approximately 5 000 people which includes an entertainment area for 200 - 300 people.

According to CEO Justice Ledwaba, 2 800 breakfasts, 3 500 dinners are served daily at the village and 14 000 hot lunch packs are delivered and served at the power station everyday.

"Our kitchen is always working," he says. "We stay open until 8:30pm to make sure everyone is fed and happy. Our kitchen was initially supposed to cater for 6 000 people when we started in 2010 but because of the Medupi construction project, we are producing over 20 000 meals a day," says Ledwaba.

LSS has placed a strong focus on the skills development and training of its staff. Ledwaba says some of his staff have come in starting as assistants, went on to be cooks and have then been promoted to be chefs to then on to head chefs.

A total 1 760 people have been upskilled by LSS and they have even made provision for those who have not completed matric to do so. One of their success stories is Julius Manyathela (25) who joined the company in 2010 as a junior in administrator, then became a catering manager and was soon identified to become a project manager in training.

Says LSS Operations Project Manager, Twenty Malubane: "The catering business is not only for ladies but a career for all. When people are introduced into formal training, they realise there's something in it for them which forms part of a much bigger picture. It is important for us to find out where people come from, what their aspirations are and what they want to achieve."

The business has created employment and business opportunities for the local companies in Lephalale and this is encouraging LSS to go into more business joint ventures.

"On-the-job training is the kind of training which enables us to impart knowledge on the spot and it has proved highly effective. We are demonstrating what needs to be done and this keeps our people interested," adds Ledwaba.

The bulk of LSS's employees are recommended by local chiefs and they are playing a pivotal role in identifying other areas where the business can contribute to the community for example through donations of food and assistance to various orphanages in the villages. Recently LSS renovated the hall at the Shongoane Traditional Leaders Office to show their appreciation for their support and partnership.

Through the contract with Eskom, LSS now considers itself a trendsetter in the field as they have been working in and have studied the catering environment well. They have systems that have been tried, tested and developed over the past 40 years and according to Ledwaba, are considered some of the best in the industry.

To support the communities surrounding the Medupi Power plant, Eskom has developed the Medupi Legacy Programme which aims to empower locals through skills development and training. LSS is one of the companies Eskom has placed contractual obligations on to empower the local community through their work in order to leave a sustainable legacy.

Champion of the programme and Medupi General Manager Roman Crookes says: "Not only is Eskom providing construction jobs during the building phase, but it's also creating job opportunities and skills once the work is completed. We want to leave behind a skilled workforce in Lephalale that can be recruited and employed elsewhere and we want to make sure by 2015, we would have played a significant part in strengthening the local community."  


The Medupi Legacy Programme - doing things with people and not for them                       Back to Top

The construction of the Medupi Power Station is not only South Africa's, but one of Africa's largest single constructions ever undertaken and as such, Eskom has made a firm commitment to leave a lasting legacy in Lephalale by improving and changing people's lives in very practical terms.

The Lephalale Municipality, situated in the northwestern part of the Limpopo province is predominately rural with 38 villages, two townships and one town. When construction began in May 2007, Eskom realised that the Lephalale community felt excluded from this major infrastructure development project unfolding in their backyards - a project set to produce 4800 megawatts (MW) of power upon completion in 2015.

Historically a coal mining town, Lephalale is dominated by electricity generation represented by the largest direct dry-cooling power station in the world, Matimba Power Station. The construction of Matimba began in 1981 and was an innovation necessitated by the severe shortage of water in the area where it is situated.

Eskom together with its partners, recognise and acknowledge that investment in socio-economic development initiatives in the surrounding area is a business imperative and it is against this background that the Medupi Legacy Programme, championed and sponsored by the Medupi General Manager Roman Crookes, was established in 2009.

Says Crookes: "Our strategy is to ensure that while we address the immediate socio-economic concerns of the local community such as employment and procurement opportunities, the foundation for sustainable growth and development is laid. SSkills, enterprise and infrastructure development in the Lephalale Municipality and the Waterberg District will contribute to the growth of the Limpopo Provincial Gross Domestic Product once the construction is complete."

This corporate social investment (CSI) flagship has four main focus areas - employment and skills development opportunities for the locals, socio-economic development, enterprise development and education, training and human resources development.

The coordination of these developmental initiatives are done in conjunction with the Lephalale Municipality and other relevant stakeholders (such as traditional leaders) to ensure the participation of the community in the identification and implementation of these initiatives. The programme was able to raise an amount of R45 million for urgent interventions identified with its partners, stakeholders and the community at large.

Employment and skills development is led by lead contractors Murray & Roberts and Hitachi Power Africa. The Tlhahlong Training Centre is the flagship project of the skills development aspect of the Medupi Legacy Programme.

The centre was started in October 2008 by Murray and Roberts as part of its contractual obligations to Hitachi which is contracted by Eskom to build the supercritical boiler plant and is required to produce 700 artisans as part of the Accelerated and Shared Growth Initiative for South Africa (ASGISA). The candidates are put through what is called an Accelerated Training Programme (AATP) and Pieter de Villiers, the centre�s manager is confident that Murray & Roberts will exceed the 700 target.

Eskom is the first, if not the only state-owned enterprise (SOE) in the country that has incorporated Accelerated and Shared Growth Initiative for South Africa (Asgisa) objectives and targets into a procurement scorecard as an evaluation criteria.

To contribute to the lasting socio-economic development of the area, Eskom identified various infrastructure development projects, wildlife and game protection initiatives, schools and education and development of health provision infrastructure.   For example, together with Exxaro, Eskom is spending close to R200 million repairing and upgrading the Nelson Mandela Road as well as tarring the Kuipersbult Road. This is being done to alleviate the traffic congestion in the area to leave a lasting legacy beyond the project. Eskom is building additional classrooms and donating computers for a number of schools and have donated infrastructure and equipment to clinics particularly in the villages.

The Eskom Contractor Academy, offers a holistic eight month long skills and business development course for identified Eskom contractors in the area. The Medupi Legacy Programme "is in the business of transforming black owned companies in particular" says Supplier Development and Localisation Regional Manager, Gabriel Mkhonza. The Academy boasts a 100 percent pass rate and almost all graduates from Academy have gone on and continue to be very successful in their respective business interests.

Crookes says once construction work has concluded in 2015, Eskom will not only have boosted the country's power generation capacity by 4,800 MW using the latest power generation technology; it will also have played a significant part in strengthening the local community and boosting job prospects for a considerable section of the population. 


Being a jack of all trades made her a business magnate                       Back to Top

Mumsy Swanepoel, the managing director of Mulanga Security Services has her eye set on the prize and is determined to make a difference in the lives of those she employs.

Beginning her business endevours in the late nineties, Swanepoel (49) has built a formidable business empire and has all the credentials and to prove it.

Her most recent achievement has been graduating from the Eskom Contractor Academy - the eight month long course designed to up-skill small and medium scale enterprises (SMMEs) surrounding Eskom new build sites in business management and planning, marketing, project management and several other relevant skills.

Lephalale, situated in the northwestern part of the Limpopo province is historically a coal mining town and is dominated by electricity generation represented by the largest direct dry-cooling power station in the world, Matimba, and more recently, Medupi, which is the fourth largest coal-powered station in the world and is currently under construction.

To support the Lephalale community and ensure the new build strengthens the local economy, Eskom has developed the Medupi Legacy Programme, which has four elements. One of these elements is enterprise development, whereby the Eskom identifies skilled and capable potential local contractors and provides them with the knowledge they need to set up and develop their own businesses. Swanepoel is one of these local contractors.

Says Medupi General Manager Roman Crookes: "We believe and it is part of our policy and strategy as Eskom to create a sustainable foundation for the locals. We don't do things for people, we do it with them and we believe equipping businesses with the necessary knowledge to compete successfully in the business world will have a ripple effect on South Africa's economy as a whole."

Swanepoel's business relations with Eskom began with providing accommodation for workers at the Matimba Power Station. Today, she not only owns and runs Mulanga Security Services but also owns a guest house, and owns shares in a major retail chain. She started her security business to close the gap created by a lack of black-owned security services in the Waterberg district.

In total, Swanepoel employs 750 people in Lephalale, White River, Bushbuckridge and Johannesburg. To empower her employees, Swanepoel has made a commitment to give her employees the opportunity to purchase shares in her business.

"The course was fantastic, I thoroughly enjoyed it and I apply what I learnt on a daily basis. With the knowledge I have gained, I am now running my business professionally and efficiently and it has also helped me secure more contracts than ever before. I keep my house in order, I don't fear anything and I go after what I want," says Swanepoel.

Through dedication and commitment, Swanepoel believes all things are possible. She began working as a cleaner but today has several business interests including a bus fleet she purchased from the South African Football Association (SAFA) after the 2010 World Cup and is currently building yet another guest house in Lephalale.  


A school born out of love is a beacon of progress for Lephalale                        Back to Top

Perseverance, hard work and determination is what took the children of Segwati Pre-school in Shongoane village, Lephalale from sweltering school days in a corrugated iron structure to a six-roomed educational facility designed specifically for Limpopo's harsh weather conditions.

It has been over a year since the staff and children of this school moved into the new facilities and not surprisingly, the principal, Helen Monanyane says the enrollment of the school has seen a sharp increase.

Monanyane, who has been instrumental in building the school, quit her job as a cleaner at a Lephalale hotel to build the school in April 2007 after realising there were no pre-schools in Shongoane to feed the primary schools.

Monanyane has always wanted to be a teacher but due to personal circumstances could not. But despite no formal training, she started the school from scratch on her own.

"It has not been an easy process", she says obviously in deep contemplation of the hardships she has endured, including losing her own child, "but I can say it has been worth it because this is for the children."

After she was granted permission by the local Headman to use a piece of land in Shongoane to build the school, construction began with the donation of labour costs and corrugated iron from Shongoane's Headman. The school was subsequently named Segwati after the Headman's late brother.

For three full months in 2007, Monanyane made endless trips the Department of Education, Department of Social Development and others to make sure the school was formally registered and all the required paperwork was done.

During this time, Monanyane's hard work caught the attention of not only the immediate local community but also the then mayor of Lephalale who recommended the school when Hitachi Power Africa (HPA), a large power plant engineering firm working on the construction of the Medupi Power Station, was looking for an educational facility to invest in.

"Our corporate social investment (CSI) approach is in education - we are a project management company in the area of power plant engineering and we therefore place a strong emphasis on education and more specifically, education for engineers because we have been aware of the extent of the shortage of skills in this area. We aim to employ as many black engineers as possible but we can hardly find them, hence we have established multiple strategies to pipeline them through bursaries and teacher intern programmes," says HPA's Head of Enterprise Development, Pamella Radebe.

The Lephalale Municipality, situated in the northwestern part of the Limpopo province is predominately rural with 38 villages, two townships and one town. Historically a coal mining town, Lephalale is the site of the  largest direct dry-cooling power station in the world, Matimba and more recently, Medupi, which is the fourth largest coal-powered station in the world and is still under construction.

Medupi is one of the largest single constructions ever undertaken on the African continent and as such, Eskom, together with its partners recognise and acknowledge that investment in socio-economic development initiatives in the surrounding area is a business imperative.

"We established the Medupi Legacy Programme in  August 2009 to ensure that while we at Eskom are building the power station to keep the lights on, it leaves a sustainable legacy in the Lephalale Municipality and the Waterberg District which will continue to contribute to growth of the Limpopo Provincial Gross Domestic Product once the construction is complete," says Roman Crookes, Medupi General Manager.

The project has placed contractual requirements on its contractors, such as HPA to contribute to skills development, job creation, enterprise development, education and human resource development.

Hitachi Power Africa invested a total of R1, 25 million to Segwati Pre-school which was used for its construction, the purchase of educational toys and on a more ongoing basis, teacher salaries. The building materials and human resources were also sourced locally and HPA has set up a fund for the school to cover maintenance costs, teacher salaries and other costs as and when they arise. 

Says Radebe: "Helen (the principal) is the reason why that school is still standing strong"  she is innovative and a beacon of what can be achieved. It is important not only for us, but for the country too. 


 Wellness centre a huge relief for Seleka village                       Back to Top

The opening of a wellness centre at the Seleka Clinic to deal specifically with HIV, TB and other related illnesses has reduced a huge burden on the staff and more importantly, the patients of the village and surrounding areas.

Seleka Clinic, which also services Marapong, Odendaal and about 12 other villages in Lephalale, was established in the late 60s and was built by members of the community. At the time, it only had two rooms, one of which was for the midwife. Through the decades it has been renovated and had more rooms added on, however the clinic has battled with overcrowding due to the high number of patients and limited space.

Seleka Clinic is one of the oldest clinics in Lephalale and according to Sister Welphina Ngoepe, who has worked there for 18 years, has a high rate of HIV infections, particularly amongst pregnant teenagers.

"We really battled with keeping up with the demand especially with the limited staff," says Ngoepe. There is also no denying that there is still a huge stigma around HIV related illnesses so patients would actually not come to get tested because all patients were in the same small space and they were afraid.

This was before Eskom, which is currently constructing the fourth largest coal-powered station, Medupi, stepped in and responded accordingly to assist the clinic with these challenges. This intervention is part of Eskom's corporate social investment (CSI) component of the Medupi Legacy Programme.

Medupi Power Station is one of the largest single constructions ever undertaken on the African continent and as such, Eskom recognises, as a business imperative, the importance of investing in socio-economic development initiatives in Lephalale and the surrounding areas. In addition to equipping the town's clinics and hospitals, the programme's CSI interventions also include repairing and upgrading the town's sewage system and potable water treatment plants.

The Medupi Legacy Programme was established in August 2009 to ensure that whilst Eskom is building the power station to keep the lights burning, it leaves a sustainable legacy in the Lephalale Municipality and the Waterberg District which will continue to contribute to growth of the Limpopo Provincial Gross Domestic Product once the construction is complete in 2015.

Says Medupi General Manager Roman Crookes: "We are in the business of lighting up people's lives in every sense of the word. We want to make sure that while the Medupi Power Station addresses the immediate concerns of the local community such as employment and procurement opportunities, it also lays a solid foundation for sustainable growth and development through skills, enterprise and infrastructure development."

Over three million rand was spent on the wellness clinic for the parkhomes (for the nurse's accommodation and the clinic itself) and medical equipment. It was officially opened in August 2011 and deals specifically with HIV, TB, STIs, reproductive health, family planning and chronic illnesses such as asthma.

Since the opening of the wellness centre, Sister Ngoepe says most HIV and TB patients no longer skip their medication and it has been a relief for them to be attended to by specialists who have the time to give them the individual attention they need.

Sister Ngoepe says the infection rate, which is highest and most prevalent in pregnant women, went down by 0.5 percent in the last quarter. On a continuous basis, the clinic works closely with the Department of Health to identify the needs of the community and also conducts various outreach campaigns in the communities to get people talking about HIV and related illnesses to reduce the stigma.

"We are also in the process of opening of a Youth Friendly Service which will be aimed at and run by young people themselves to educate their peers on HIV and teenage pregnancy amongst other things. We want to make it a safe, fun and comfortable space where young people can get together and do more positive things for themselves and the community," says Ngoepe.  


Meet the rough diamond turned foreman at Medupi Power Station                        Back to Top

When Lincoln Mohlaka had to give up his studies in Metallurgy at the University of the Witwatersrand in 2007, he thought his future was doomed and for months he was shattered.

Fast forward to 2013 and Mohlaka (26) is now a certified artisan boilermaker by trade currently working at the Medupi Power Station in Lephalale, the fourth largest coal-powered station in the world which is still under construction.

Mohlaka was part of the first group of apprentices and the youngest at the time to be trained at the Tlhahlong Training Centre an artisan training centre sponsored by Murray & Roberts, Medupi's lead contractor and South Africa's second-largest construction company. Their intention is to donate this facility to the Lephalale FET once the construction of the Medupi Power Station is complete.

According to the training centre's manager, Pieter de Villiers, Tlhahlong is one of the few training facilities in the country that has been granted the license to certify and accredit artisans and a total 24 million was spent to build the facility and purchase all the necessary equipment. To date, the centre has produced approximately 380 qualified artisans and another 300 are currently in training.

"Our intention on this project is to empower the local community - Murray & Roberts wants to leave a lasting legacy in Lephalale and implement a project that will go a long way towards addressing the skills shortage in the area. We want to see young people becoming qualified artisans who will be able to support themselves, their families and contribute meaningfully to the economic growth of this country. For me personally, to see success is my reward and people like Lincoln who I've seen grow from strength to strength are an inspiration," says de Villiers.

Mohlaka is one of Thlahlong's major success stories and has witnessed firsthand the construction of the Medupi Power Station almost from the very beginning.

"When I got there, I was a rough diamond and most of us in our group had never worked before. When we started, they were just starting to build the lift shafts for boiler six and others were doing the cementation on the ground. Today when I walk through site, I can literally point out the things I have had a hand in building and it's an amazing feeling to be part of such big milestones," says Mohlaka.

Mohlaka has worked his way up to Foreman status at an above average rate. After training at Thlahlong, he went to the Medupi Power Station for on-site training in the piping department, a crucial part of boilermaking. Even at that early stage as an apprentice, his foreman saw great potential and believed in him so much that he let him lead his own team. From there he was sent to the pipe workshop (where the pipes are fabricated) where he mastered the craft.  After 18 months on site, he went back to the training centre, completed his trade tests, qualified as an artisan and was promoted to Foreman after a year of working.

"Critics often said I was young and didn't have experience but I learnt fast that out there that when working with people who have been doing this since before you were born, you shouldn't try to act like a boss. To make the best out the situation and produce the work of the required standard, you have to work with them, listen to them and most importantly, learn from them," reflects Mohlaka.

The Tlhahlong Training Centre is the flagship of the Medupi Legacy Programme which was established in August 2009 to ensure that whilst Eskom is building the power station to keep the lights burning, it leaves a sustainable legacy in the Lephalale Municipality and the Waterberg District, which will contribute to growth of the Limpopo Provincial Gross Domestic Product. Skills development, job creation, enterprise development, education and human resource development are the main focus areas of the programme.

Champion of the programme and Medupi General Manager Roman Crookes says: "We want to leave behind a skilled workforce in Lephalale that can be recruited and employed elsewhere. Once construction work has concluded in 2015, Eskom will not only have boosted the power generation capacity by 4,800 megawatts using the latest power generation technology, it will also have played a significant part in strengthening the local community and boosting job prospects for a considerable section of the population."

The training centre was started in October 2008 by Murray and Roberts as part of its contractual obligations to Hitachi which is contracted by Eskom to build the supercritical boiler plant and is required to produce 700 artisans as part of the Accelerated and Shared Growth Initiative for South Africa (ASGISA). The candidates are put through what is called an Accelerated Training Programme (AATP) and de Villiers is confident that Murray & Roberts will exceed the target of 700 qualified artisans.  


 Business of Eskom Contractor Academy graduate thriving                        Back to Top

William Mathoni's various business interests in Lephalale have expanded and are thriving, but he is still hungry for more.

Mathoni (32), who first registered his business, Zimzeni 268 in 1999, now has an office on site at the Medupi Power Station - the world�s fourth largest coal-powered station.

He has always wanted to own his own business so when the announcement of the construction of Medupi was made, he jumped at the chance and brainstormed ideas on how to make the most of this opportunity together with his partner.

He first made contact with representatives at the Medupi Information Centre in Lephalale in 2009 to express the difficulty he was experiencing with regards to applying for a bursary to study further, which is when he was told about the Eskom Contractor Academy. He was accepted into the course and attended classes at Edupark in Polokwane for a week every month.

The Academy offers a holistic eight month-long skills and business development course to Eskom contractors and suppliers wishing to receive training in management, finance, entrepreneurship, legislation and technical skills. Upon successful completion of the entire course, the qualifications for the individual modules are accredited by the Construction Education and Training Authority (CETA) and certificates are awarded by the University of Limpopo.

Mathoni began his business dealings with the Medupi Power Station by supplying cartridges in 2010 until the opportunity to erect a parking lot at the power station came up. In December of that same year, he met with Eskom and in 2011 was awarded the tender to construct the parking lot.

Today Mathoni has his fingers in lots of different pies with business interests in supplying schools with computers (and repairs), printers and other office materials. He owns a tuck-shop on site and also supplies groceries to Sisonke Catering. He secured a contract to build a school in Seleka Village and currently has his eyes fixed on taking his manufacturing business to greater heights. He is currently manufacturing sliding gates, doors, burglar guards and gates and plans to approach manufacturing retailers to sell his equipment in their stores.

"I am not where I want to be, I am still on my way there but slowly and surely getting there," says Mathoni. "I want to have a sustainable business so whatever lucrative opportunity I find to invest in, I take it on."

The development of local businesses is one of the four crucial elements of the Medupi Legacy Programme, a project designed to make a difference in people�s lives in real and practical terms while Eskom is building the power station. One of these elements is enterprise development, whereby  Eskom identifies skilled and capable potential local contractors and provides them with the knowledge they need to set up and develop their own businesses. Mathoni is one of these local contractors.

Says Medupi General Manager Roman Crookes: "We believe and it is part of our policy and strategy as Eskom to create a sustainable foundation for the locals. We don't do things for people, we do it with them and we believe equipping business people with the necessary knowledge to compete successfully in the business world will have a ripple effect on South Africa's economy as a whole."